Tuesday, December 19, 2006

Native America, Discovered and Conquered- The History of Federal Indian Policy


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"The destruction of the Indians of the Americas was, far and away, the most massive act of genocide in the history of the world." David E. Stannard.

3 comments:

Starrider said...

George Washington, guilty of acts of genocide

In North America, during the war against the French, the Iroquois tribes sided with England and were rewarded with a status that allowed them to have land and commercial rights as well as protection against the expansion of colonists. When the war of independence broke out, the settled Iroquois tribes of the State of New York supported the English soldiers and participated in the actions against the rebel colonists. On June 4, 1779, the General of the Revolutionary Army, George Washington, violated the treaty and ordered the invasion of the territory of the Iroquois confederation. He insisted in killing as many Indians as possible without taking into account age or sex. The survivors were to be given as agricultural slaves to the colonists who deserved them “Destroying not only the men but the settlements and the plantations is very important. All sown fields must be destroyed and new plantations and harvests must be prevented. What lead can not do will be done by hunger and winter.” From June to December, 40 Indian settlements were massacred and thousands of their plantations were devastated.

Starrider said...

Genocide by the provisions of the convention of the United Nations in Dec. 1948 is defined as:

"any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group, and includes five types of criminal actions: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; and forcibly transferring children of the group to another group."

Lyman Legters
"The American Genocide"
Policy Studies Journal, vol. 16, no. 4, summer 1988

Starrider said...

"Hitler's concept of concentration camps as well as the practicality of genocide owed much, so he claimed, to his studies of English and United States history. He admired the camps for Boer prisoners in South Africa and for the Indians in the wild west; and often praised to his inner circle the efficiency of America's extermination - by starvation and uneven combat - of the "red savages" who could not be tamed by captivity." P. 202, "Adolph Hitler" by John Toland